Days 3 and 4 of #PlasticFreeJuly

I want to say Happy Fourth of July, but I’m not sure if I’m feeling extremely patriotic. BUT that’s beside the point.

For some reason, this challenge has inspired me to go back to DIYing everything instead of ordering it off of Amazon and making more trash. I’ve been trying to find some zero waste skincare since my new job has required me to sweat almost all day. I forget every day when I come home to wash my face and don’t think I have the proper skincare products anyways for my type of skin.

I’ve always liked rosewater toners since they help balance the face’s pH and helps reduce excess oils, which I produce plenty of. Toners are meant to help remove the rest of the bad things on your face after you’ve exfoliated and cleansed it. It’s supposed to help bring back your face’s pH back to normal. All of the sprays that I’ve used previously or found online are packaged in plastic bottles, which are most likely not recyclable and I really wouldn’t know what to try to use it for.

I have one bottle currently that I can definitely use though, which inspired me to find a recipe online. I say recipe, but it’s really just a methodology on how to make my own rose water that will be good for my skin. So I found one. This one by Going Zero Waste. I went out and got myself some red roses, for decoration and for this recipe. I found myself some witch hazel, which I had never used before, but apparently is really good for cleansing your face.

IMG-1086I put around 6-7 roses-worth of rose petals in a small pot and filled it with filtered water from my fridge. Remember that this is going on your face, so if your tap water isn’t the best, make sure to use filtered water. I set it to simmer on low and covered it with a lid. And left it there to do its thing, for around 30 minutes, checking in on it every so often. You will notice the color of the petals changing and the water’s color changing, too. I poured the water into a sangria bottle we had laying around at home and mixed equal parts witch hazel and rose water. I waited until it had cooled down a little bit and put it in the fridge to cool. Everywhere that I’ve read recommends keeping your rosewater toners and such in the fridges to keep them cool and help maintain their benefits.

The next thing I worked on were cotton rounds. I have been dying to buy some anywhere so I can stop using my towels for cleaning my makeup off. I finally found a good alternative to makeup remover, the Clinique Take The Day Off Cleansing Balm. It came as a sample in some sort of birthday thing at some point months ago and I still have at least half of it left. It’s a little bit pricier, but it seems to last a surprisingly long time. I do have to disclaim that I don’t wear a full face of makeup, I just wear eye making most of the time, but it seems to do an incredible job of removing that without insane amounts of rubbing or the need for wipes after.

The second thing I’ve found that helps me reduce my waste when it comes to skin care are Makeup Eraser towels. Ulta sells a cheaper alternative, but they are incredible. They have to sides: one to remove makeup and the other to exfoliate. You can use them for months and years and wash them when they get too dirty in the laundry. It’s incredible and I highly recommend it.

Anyways, I decided that it was time to make my own cotton rounds so I could use themIMG-1089 with my new rosewater toner and any other skincare items that I might need to use on my face. I went out to Goodwill, the color of the week was yellow. I looked at the $1 T-Shirt men’s section to find any with the yellow tags that were 100% cotton. I found at least 6 of them and only paid $0.50 for each. I can make so many rounds with just one shirt. I made variations of two pieces, three, and four pieces. I definitely recommend three or four pieces and this way it’ll hold more of the liquid inside. It was fairly easy to get back into the swing of sewing with my mom’s sewing machine. Even the imperfect ones are still useful, so none of them will go to waste.

I am pretty proud of the two things I was able to make today that will help me reduce both my plastic waste and my general waste. If you have any questions about anything in this blog post, comment below or get in touch with me.

Until next time,

Dani

Wasteless Makeup Removal

Don’t you wish you could just wipe your makeup off with a magical sleeve like Mulan?

Image result for makeup wipes gif

Think about how many makeup wipes do you throughout a week (That is assuming you wear makeup).

I counted mine: 6-7 a week. That’s only when I wear mascara and eyeliner. Imagine if I wear a “full face” of makeup, I’d probably use 2 just in one sitting.

The makeup industry is extremely wasteful in general and for someone who loves makeup, like me, it’s really hard to just quit using it. I love lipsticks and mascaras and eyeliners, but they are really so wasteful. They come in either a plastic wrapping or a box. The box can easily be recycled, but not the plastic. I’m still on the hunt for a really good waste-free makeup company, but this blog is about makeup wipes. 

They’re so wasteful and you can’t reuse them. They come in a plastic bag, too. I try using mine until there isn’t any empty space on the wipe itself, but I still throw it out eventually. I easily found an alternative for them: cotton round pads that can be washed in the washer. You can easily DIY cotton rounds from old t-shirts or towels.

Image result for diy reusable makeup remover pads

What about the actual makeup remover water? Those come in plastic bottles, right?

Finding the alternative to the actual makeup remover has been the most challenging thing for me, but the answer was right there, on my bathroom vanity….coconut oil!

According to two dermatologists, Anthony Youn and Carl Thornfeldt, they both agree that coconut oil is a good choice when choosing a makeup remover. They both agree that coconut oil is not only safe to use when cleansing your face, but it also offers other benefits to our skin. You have to keep in mind that coconut oil may not be compatible with all skin types and so testing it on a small patch of your skin. They suggest that you can easily use the coconut oil by rubbing it on your eyes gently, without using any cotton pads or anything, and then gently washing it.

There is a chance that coconut oil can clog pores, but this possibility can be removed by using organic and minimally processed oil. Cold-pressed doesn’t have toxins in the process that would impact the skin. Another great thing about coconut oil is that it can be bought in bulk and also in glass containers (that you can reuse later on or recycle).

Dr. Bronner’s Organic Virgin Coconut Oil. Unrefined White Kernel Coconut Oil Tub. (14 oz. Glass Jar)Nutiva Organic Virgin Coconut Oil, 23 Ounce

You can generally find these glass jar coconut oils at places like Whole Foods, or your local grocery store, but you can also buy them on Amazon.

 

 

 

Sure, it’s a little bit messy and can have you looking like this:

Image result for coconut oil makeup remover

But you would be reducing your waste drastically if makeup wipes are your preferred removal option. Try it out. Use the coconut oil for a week and test it out for yourself. If it doesn’t work on its own, you can always try this homemade makeup removal recipe:

  • 1 cup distilled water
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons baby shampoo (no tears)
  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil
  • a few drops of your favorite essential oil (optional).

There are also other oils you can use instead of coconut oil, such as castor oil, but coconut oil should be okay to use.

Until next time,

Dani