Episode 5: Carbon Footprints!

Have you ever wondered about carbon footprints? Maybe you want to offset your emissions somehow…well it’s a thing you can do and I talk a little bit about it on this episode!

Episode 4: Twenty-Something Environmentalists

Hey guys! I’m finally back with another episode. I know it’s been quite some time since I posted one, but it has been a couple of crazy weeks for me. Nonetheless, I’m back with another episode and this time I’m accompanied by one of my fellow classmates, Adrian Figueroa. He is a senior, like me, at Florida International University studying Environmental Studies. We kind of talk a little about everything relating to our field and what it is like being environmentalists in this world and at our age. We touch on some issues regarding diversity within our field and things that we would do to help move that forward.

I hope you enjoy this longer episode and I will talk to you guys in a week (hopefully!).

Until next time,

Dani

Waste-Free Christmas Presents

I hope everyone has been having an incredible holiday season! Hopefully, it’s been a waste-free one, too.

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One of my very good friends from my time at Purdue, Alaina, who is a pretty waste-free person already, decided to gift me the most thoughtful gift this season. She got me shampoo and conditioner bars! She got me a sampler of different “flavors”, which is perfect because my hair can be a little temperamental.

This specific pack brings three shampoo bars and two conditioner bars. The three shampoo bars are Frizz Wrangler, Heali Kiwi, and St. Clemens.

Frizz Wrangler is made of coconut and is supposed to be perfect for dry, frizzy hair. Heali Kiwi is made from kiwifruit, neem and Karanja oils that help soothe and calm irritated scalps. St. Clemens is made from orange and lime oils that help cleanse and refresh.

The two conditioner bars are The Guardian and Wonderbar. The Guardian is made from coconut, cocoa butter, and crushed limes for a smooth and lush look. Wonderbar is made with coconut and cocoa butter, so like The Guardian is very smoothing and hydrating.

I have now used the bars a couple of times and each time I am amazed that they actually work. I think the concept to me is just so weird, but it works! My hair feels clean, frizz-free, not greasy, and super shiny. My hair is in between curly and waving and it actually makes my curls come out. I do think if I want to wear my hair curly, then I’ll have to find some sort of oil or solution that I can make at home to make my hair more bouncy.

The next thing that I got, for myself, for Chrismas was toothpaste in a tube. I know! A tube?? How COULD you?! I did it, but it’s not a normal toothpaste. It’s Dr. Bronner’s Pepperming All-One Toothpaste. It’s fluoride-free, made from 70% organic ingredients and the packaging is 100% recyclable (including the tube). I tried to buy Davids Toothpaste, which comes in a metal tube aka recyclable, but it would not get here in time for my trip.

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I previously had been using the Bite toothpaste bite things, but I am not really a fan of the taste of it and also I feel like I don’t know how to properly use them. It’s mostly the taste for me, though. So because of this, I had been looking up different toothpaste alternatives. I found out that there are companies that recycle toothpaste tubes. One of them is TerraCycle’s Oral Care Recycling Program. You can fill a box with toothbrushes, toothpaste tubes and caps, and floss containers and mail them to TerraCycle for recycling. They have a rewards program where you can redeem the points for cash donations to the school or nonprofit organization of your choice.

There’s a website that helps you find recycling solutions in your area called Earth911 Recycling Search.

This coming year, I think if you can’t change your entire life to a zero waste life, try to change small things. This way you can get into the grove of living a little differently. Stop grabbing the plastic bag when you shop, start bringing your own. This can maybe lead you to stop asking for straws or single-use utensils with your take-out or at restaurants. It just starts with one small thing. You’ll start noticing that people are so wasteful all of a sudden. You don’t have to immediately change to shampoo and conditioner bars, but you can maybe buy bigger bottles of your shampoo/conditioner or buy bulk with your own containers. You’ll start to be more conscious of your choices and how they might affect our environment.

You can do this.

We can do this.

Until next time,

Dani

Zero Waste Holiday Tips!

So, I’ve been AWOL for some time, but I’m back with some zero waste tips!

This holiday try not to forget your “zero-waste” mentality. I know it’s going to be really hard, but you have to try.

First thing is first: WRAPPING PAPER.

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That’s actually me every year when I see the two giant black (plastic) garbage bags only filled with wrapping paper at my house.

You might not know this but wrapping paper is really hard to recycle. Some can be recycled, but before recycling, you have to remove any sticky tape and decorations such as ribbons and bows as those things can’t be recycled. Wrapping paper can only be recycled if it passes the scrunch test. Simple wrapping paper can be recycled but foil or glitter-decorated paper cannot and needs to go in the general waste.

Those very thick wrapping papers generally cannot be recycled because there is some component to them that has plastic, aka it’s not simple paper.

Some great alternatives can be kraft paper. That brown paper that is easily recycled and looks like something your kids probably used in their kindergarten class to drawn on. You can easily customize the wrapping paper with drawings and designs, if you have the time, if not you can just wrap some burlap around it and make it some cute, rustic-feeling wrapping style.

If you use paper bags at the grocery store, you can also use that as gift wrapping and reuse!

Some other alternatives (that might be weird, but are recyclable):

  • Recycled paper
  • Newspaper
  • Scrap fabric
  • Old men’s button down
  • A bag that’s part of the gift
  • Vintage scarf
  • Pretty dish cloth
  • Literally any fabric-like thing

You can decorate your wrapping with real plants, old jewelry, sticks, or cards written on recycled paper or cardboard to amp up that rustic style.

If you want to splurge on some fancy recycled wrapping paper, the Container Store has some at their stores.

This was wrapped with an old men’s button down. Picture from trashisfortossers.com

If you’re going to insist on going out and buying something new to use for wrapping, try to use gift bags. Those are always reusable and if you or the person receiving the gift is anything like my family, that gift bag will be reused over and over again. This does not reduce the waste, but it definitely delays it.

You can use reusable bags, like a cotton produce sack, that the present receiver will be able to use after opening their gift.

A produce bag. Picture from trashisfortossers.com

Here is a video on how to use fabric to wrap presents, it’s a little overwhelming, but at the end of the day, you are going to be reducing your waste…even if it takes a little longer to wrap.

Besides the wrapping paper, tape is also another major waste product that comes with the holidays. Paper tape is easily accessible and can be a great alternative to normal plastic tape. You can also use twine or any other (plastic-free) type of cord to close your present.

Recycled paper/Kraft paper can be used to make the card for the outside of the present.

I know it takes a little bit more effort, but you have to care just a little bit. The amount of wrapping paper that gets thrown out is insane. Americans throw away 25% more trash during Thanksgiving to New Year’s holiday period than any other time of the year. The extra waste amounts to 25 million TONS of garbage, or about 1 MILLION EXTRA TONS PER WEEK.

If you’re not sure what to give people around you, you can try to go to the Package Free Shop. They have some really handy Zero Waste Kits that are easy gifts and come with their own reusable bag. You can encourage those around you to start their own zero-waste journey!

I hope these quick zero-waste holiday tips help you be zero-waste this holiday season.

Happy holidays!

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Dani